Technical data
Type MK-1
Function Reconnaissater
Bomber
Year 1916
Crew 4
Engines 2*220hp Renault
1*140hp Hispano
Wingspan 31.0m
Length 30.0m

MK-1, D.P.Grigorovich

36k drawing (reconstruction by A.N.Sedelnikov) from "History of aircraft construction in the USSR", Vol.1 p.249;

Finished and rolled out for tests in late 1916, this was the second large hydroplane in the world (after floatplane version of the 'Ilya Mourometz'). Requirements on long-range maritime reconnaissater and bomber (for Baltic and Black sea) were issued by Central Headquarters. Construction drawings were not found...

It was single-float biplane with large float integrated with fuselage (or vice versa). Size and shape of the float allow to put this aircraft between flying boats and floatplanes. In the nose section of the hull was large compartment for gunner/observer. It was planned to install a large (up to 3 inches) cannon there.

Fuselage generally repeated construction of 'Ilya Mourometz' fuselage, with enclosed glazed pilot cockpit and spacious cabin. The 'wing box' had flexible link to the fuselage (rubber cord suspended), allowing displacement up to 180mm. Year later this scheme was patented by Farman (sounds interesting in conjunction with vanished drawings... A.S.).

Initially pair of 220hp 'Renault' was planned to power the aircraft. During assembly became clear that aircraft has too rear center of gravity location. Instead of moving weights around (what was found insufficient) third engine was installed in the center of the upper wing (150hp 'Sunbeam', later - 140hp 'Hispano-Suiza').

Flight test were scheduled near St.Petersburg on mid-November (not the best time due to bad weather). Tests were carried out by Ya.I.Sedov. On the first high speed taxi aircraft performed a noseover and sunk. Crew managed to escape safe. MK-1 was retrieved, but heavy damage and necessity of radical hull modifications resulted in project cancellation.



References:
  • "History of aircraft construction in the USSR", Vol.1 p.249-251;

  • Modified November 3, 1997 Back to
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