Technical data
Type S-6 S-6A S-6B
Function experimental/record biplane
Year 1911
November
1912
May
1912?
Crew 1 1 1+3 passengers
Engines 100hp Argus
Empty Weight 650kg 650kg 590kg
Maximum Weight 850/990kg 900/1100kg 917kg
Length 8.8m 9.2m 8.5m
Wing Span 11.8m 14.5/11.7m 14.9/11.9m
Wing Area 35.4m2 39.0m2 37.5m2
Speed 111km/h with 3 people 111-120km/h
106km/h with 5 people
113km/h
load 327kg

S-6, S-6A, S-6B, I.I.Sikorsky

(32k b/w) S-6. Courtesy of Carl J. Bobrow and the National Air and Space Museum;

Biplane, very similar in appearance to the S-5. One of the best early I.I.Sikorsky designs. Developed as fast as in 3 months (thanks to intensive tests in a 'wind tunnel'!), it employed aerodynamically clean airframe and flat (2.5m long) aluminum tube radiator for 100hp Argus engine. Wheels were covered with aluminum disks,

(24k b/w) S-6A. Courtesy of Aviation Museum (Canada);

Speed with 2 passengers and pilot 111km/h was a world record for biplanes!

Further modifications of S-6 (S-6A and S-6B) had tail frame replaced by normal covered fuselage. Upper wing was slightly increased, ailerons on the lower wing eliminated. All tension wires were arranged in pairs with wooden piece between them. As a result their drag was cut by half.

S-6A (28k b/w), "History of aircraft construction in the USSR", Vol.1 p.75;
S-6B (24k b/w), "History of aircraft construction in the USSR", Vol.1 p.92;

The first I.I.Sikorsky aircraft built at Russo-Baltic Wagon Works, R-BVZ was S-6B. All aircraft built before the S-6B were built in a barn in an estate belonging to Igor's father (Kiev/Kiev).

S-6B was built for international military competition held by Russian government in July 1912, where it won the first prize. It featured a reinforced undercarriage (by request of military pilots) as well as a gear for starting the 100 h.p. Argus engine from the cockpit. Speed with a load of 327kg was 113km/h. I.I.Sikorsky won first prize in competition among 11 flying machines, several were designed by famous European firms as Farman, Nieuport and Fokker.


Sources:
  • article(?) by Carl J. Bobrow found at RAP by A. Gretchihine and incorporated into this page.
  • 'Igor Sikorsky - The Russian Years' by K.N.Finne
  • "History of aircraft construction in the USSR", Vol.1 p.74-75,93;

  • Modified September 4, 1997 Back to
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