General Information
Type Yak-1B
Function Fighter
Year 1942
Crew 1
Powerplant
Type M-105PA
Power at 0m 1020hp
Maximum Power 1100hp
Power at 4000m 1050hp
Size
Length 8.48m
Height ?m
Wingspan 10.0m
Wing area 17.15m2
Weights and loads
Empty 2394kg
Loaded 2883kg
Wing Load (kg/m2) 165
Power load (kg/hp) 2.76
Speed
at 0m 478km/h
at 4850m 563km/h
Landing 137km/h
Maneuverability
Turn time 19sec
Roll
Takeoff 320m sec
Landing 530m sec
Ceiling
Ceiling 10400m
Climb
1000m 5.9min
Range
Practical 650km
Payload
Fuel 305kg
Gun Type (Position)Ammo
1*20mm ShVAK (engine) 120...140
1*12.7mmUBS 200...240
Salvo (kg/sec) 2.0
Bombs see Yak-1 M-105PA with bombs
Rockets see Yak-1 with RS-82

Yak-1 with improved cockpit view, armoring and armament (Yak-1B), A.S.Yakovlev

(22k b/w) Modified Yak-1 with a tear-drop canopy. "Soviet Combat Aircraft of the Second World War" by Yefim Gordon and Dmitri Khazanov, Vol.1
Courtesy of Thomas Heinz

In June 1942 series Yak-1 (N°35-60 built at Factory N°292) serving with Moscow PVO district was modified at the Yakovlev OKB. Following changes were made:


Cockpit/Canopy:

Similar canopy modifications were performed on service Yak-1 in field conditions by pilots and technicians of 42th IAP (Maj.F.I.Shinkarenko). Simple aircraft construction did not require special tooling to modify, and quality of Shinkarenko Yak's were same as factory-built Yak-1b.

New armament saved 8.5kg of weight and resulted in 15% increase in aircraft salvo. Large caliber bullets of the UBS resulted in more serious damage than the rifle ShKAS ammo. Indeed, simple 'salvo' characteristic does not objectively reflects the aircraft firepower.

Flight tests of modified Yak-1 N°35-60 was test-flown in July 4 to 14, 1942. 16 flights (totalling 8h15min) were performed by test-pilots of NII VVS A.G.Proshakov, P.M.Stefanovskij, A.G.Kochetkov, L.M.Kuvshinov, V.I.Khomiakov and supervised by leading engineer A.Pronin and technician L.V.Nikolaev.

Aircraft handling was identical to series Yak-1, but all pilots agreed that all-around view is superior to all fighter aircraft in the VVS inventory.

The GKO ordered new Yak into production on August 11, 1942. First 10 Yak-1B were assembled in September, and starting the next months Yak-1B replaced all other Yak-1 variants on the production lines.

Official combat trials were carried out starting December 10 1942 until January 28 1943. 58 aircraft were assigned to the 32th Guards IAP of 210th IAD 3rd VA (Kalinin Front) and 176th IAP of 283rd IAD 16th VA (Stalingrad Front). 669 sorties were flown (617h), during which 38 air combats took place. 25 enemy aircraft were shot down: 5xBf-109F, 6xFw-190, 8xJu-87, 3xHe-111, 2xHs-126, 1xJu-88 while 6 Yak-1B were lost.

(54k b/w) Before the pilot has even had time to dismount, a Yak-1 is pushed into the trees and its hide. "Soviet Combat Aircraft of the Second World War" by Yefim Gordon and Dmitri Khazanov, Vol.1
Courtesy of Thomas Heinz

Improved armament, fire control ad armoring of the pilot's compartment were highly priced by pilots and accepted as a standard for all Soviet fighters.

Since March 1943 (127th batch) ShVAK was increased from 120 to 140 rounds and UBS from 200 to 240.

Total production of Yak-1B was 4188 aircraft.

PredecessorsModifications
series Yak-1 with M-105P
Yak-1 M-105PA
Yak-1M Yak-1 with improved airdynamics
Yak-1 with improved airdynamics
ReferencesLinks
  • "Yak fighters of the Great Patriotic War period" by A.T .Stepanets
  • "History of aircraft construction in the USSR", Vol.2 p.193-194;
  • Watson's Yak-1B
  • Yakovlev Fighters of the Great Patriotic War
  • Legacy of the White Rose
  • Yakovlev Yak-1b by Frank Crenshaw
  • Yak-1b Out of the Box
  • Yak-1b for FSim is available here

  • Created June 14, 2000 Back to
    Main Gate