Technical data
(in brackets - with external fuel tank))
Type Yak-25
Function Interceptor
Year 1954
Crew 2
Engines 2*2000kg AM-5A
Length 15.67m
Height ?m
Wingspan 10.94m
Wing area 28.94m2
Empty weight 5675(5720)kg
Loaded weight 8675(9450)kg
Wing Load (kg/m2) 300(327)
Thrust
to
Weight
0.46(0.42)
Speed at 5000m 1090km/h
Landing Roll 800m
Takeoff Roll 735m
practical Ceiling 14500m
Climb
Rate at 0m 50m/sec
10,000m 5.5min
Range 2100(2700)km
Flight Endurance 2.56(3.41)h
Armament
Guns 2*37mm N-37L
(50 rounds/gun)

Yak-25, by A.S.Yakovlev ('Flashlight')

44k b/w Yak-25 from 'Notes of an aircraft designer' by A.Yakovlev;

Governmental order for long-range 2-engine 2-seat interceptor resulted in Yak-120 prototype. Despite somewhat short on range, new jet had very good characteristics. First production aircraft, designated Yak-25, started rolling out from the Saratov Aviation Plant in September 1954. Planned radar station 'Sokol' was not ready, and first batches were equipped with modified RP-1D radio range finder. Yak-25 entered service despite (formally) not accepted by military. Sixty seven such aircraft were built until January 1955.

Yak-25 'Red 03' at the Monino AF Museum near Moscow; Photo (41k) by John Sloan

When the 'Sokol' radar set finally passed trials stage and entered production in 1954. Under RP-6 designation it was installed on production Yak-25, which got new designation Yak-25M.

First public presentation took place in July 1955 at Tushino airshow. Foreign experts immediately found that new Soviet jet is very similar to French 'Vautour'...

Yak-25 'Red 03' at the Monino AF Museum near Moscow; Photo (37k) by Paul Nann

Capable interceptor of mid-50's, Yak-25 quickly aging began on the break of 60's. Despite more and more obsolete, Yak-25s stayed in service because for a while there were no replacement for them. Aircraft had good reputation among pilots, and extensive training allowed to keep them in a high degree of a combat readiness. Since 1963 retirement process started. Last Yak-25s were withdrawn from service in 1967. Few machines found their way to museums and design schools, the rest were stored and later scrapped.

27k and 26k, at the Khodynka AF Museum; Photos by Paul Nann;
PredecessorsModifications

Yak-120

Yak-25RV

Yak-26

Yak-125
Yak-25L
-
Yak-25M/MG

Yak-25K-7/8
Yak-25MSh Yak-25R

ReferencesLinks
  • "Russian aircraft since 1940" by Jean Alexander, p.477-482;
  • Yak-25 at the Russian Power
  • Yak-25 at Virtual Aircraft Museum
  • Yak-120, Yakovlev
  • Yak-25, Yakovlev
  • Saratov Aviation Plant

  • Created December 11, 1996
    Modified July 6, 1999
    Back to
    Main Gate